Exercise 22: Identifying Tools & Materials Key Steps in Illustration Part 4

Key Steps in Illustration: Exercise 22: Identifying Tools & Material, Pt. 1

The next section in the course reflects the artist’s personal style, which is something like the artist’s handwriting and signature of their work. I think it something that resides within you already and that you have to develop throughout your studies and your career.

The following exercise asks to identify illustrators that work with particular tools and materials and look at their way of working more closely. The first step is to create a “catalogue” of illustrators. The catalogue should comprise different categories that represent a certain tool or material, and give examples of illustrators that work in this particular style.

I have collected quite a lot of inspirational illustrators, and regularly get books like “Illustration Now” out of the library. I love browsing books like that because you discover so many fantastic artists and styles in a short time. I usually make a note of the ones I like and then look them up online to discover more of their work.

In the following you will find my illustrators catalogue according to their tools and materials. I also made some notes about their particular style overall. Generally I found it very difficult to group the illustrators, as most seem to work with more than one media, e.g. mix pen and acrylics, and most also edit the final pieces digitally.

Pen & Pencil

  • Fumi Nakamura (see examples here)
    • Pencil/pen lines
    • Mostly girls and animals, realisticly drawn
    • Black and white only or black lines with details in colour
    • Light and airy style

Watercolour

  • Steve Brodner (see examples here)
    • Political satire, depicting international politics
    • Illustrations in watercolour
    • Caricature
    • Distroted faces (huge faces compared to body size)
  • Keemo (see examples here)
    • Uses watercolours, ink, and acrylics
    • bright colours
    • Abstract figures
    • Black outlines, colourful shapes
    • Portraits
  • Julia Guther (see examples here, here, and here)
    • Airy style
    • Mix of abstract shapes and actual figures / landscapes
    • Figures usually drawn with black lines, shapes or geometrical forms in colour

Ink

  • Madeleine Stamer (see examples here)
    • Black dynamic lines, with coloured highlights
    • Symplified animals
    • Decorative use of patterns, e.g. flowers
  • Margot Macé (see examples here)
    • Fashion illustrations
    • Women portraits & female outfits
    • Black outlines, often with coloured highlights or shapes in colour
  • Toril Baekmark (see examples here)
    • Flowers
    • Female figures
    • Black-and-white, sometimes with coloured highlights/shapes
    • Figures are outlined only, some details for the fae
    • Airy style
  • Stina Persson (see examples here)
    • Coloured inks
    • Portraits / sometimes with flowers
    • Portraits without outlines, colourful shapes only to create the faces or figures
    • Colours are blendes
  • Raquel Aparicio (see examples here)
    • Animals, people, landscapes
    • Black and coloured lines, highlights in colour
    • Creative ideas
    • Mix of lines and patterns
    • Expressive figures/animals
  • Yuko Shimizu (see my review here, and examples here)
    • Ink on paper, later coloured digitally
    • Japanese culture is visible
    • Imaginative ideas
    • Surreal scenes

Gouache

  • Christopher Corr (examples here and here)
    • Bright colours
    • Playful style
    • Lots of content / details in his illustrations

Oil

  • Naja Conrad-Hansen (see examples here)
    • Fashion illustration
    • Blending illustration, graphic design, painting
    • Figures often in black outlines, details in colours
  • Anne Faith Nicholls (see examples here)
    • Sureal scenes featuring figures, animals, rooms
    • Oil on big canvases
    • Often dark colours
    • Hidden meanings
  • Andrew Hem (see examples here)
    • Dark and gloomy illustrations
    • Figures in a landscape scene, often with grim expressions
    • Faces are very expressive
    • Surreal elements

Acrylic

  • Olaf Hajek (see my review here, and examples here)
    • Colourful and imaginative portraits
    • Floral and natural elements
  • Amanda Visell (see examples here)
    • Playful illustrations for kids
    • Personified animals, e.g. playing instruments
    • Dark colours
  • Irana Douer (see examples here)
    • Female portraits
    • Black outlines, colourful highlights
    • Prominent use of black lines
    • Surreal elements
  • Vincent Bakkum (see examples here)
    • Female portrais
    • Nature elements (birds, flowers, leaves)
    • Retro look-and-feel
    • Pastel colours
  • Kristiana Pärn (see examples here)
    • Simplified animals in landscapes
    • Personification of animals
    • Background colours blend into each other
    • Mainly blue and green
  • Hope Gangloff (see examples here and here)
    • Colourful portraits
    • Little use of black (at least it seems). Instead hair, etc. are often created with fine lines in blue and other colours
  • Daniel Bueno (see examples here)
    • Surreal elements
    • Distorted faces / large heads
    • Cubism elements
    • Often blue / brown colours
    • Dynamic compositions
    • Expressive illustrations

Collage

  • Ilana Kohn (see examples here)
    • vibrant colours
    • Playful scenes
    • collage mixed with paintings
  • Emmanuel Polanco (see examples here)
    • Paintings and collage combined
    • Lots of red, black, beige colours
    • Surreal scenes
    • Sometimes gloomy, yet airy style
  • Maximo Tuja (see examples here)
    • Surreal scenes
    • Lots of black-and-white photographs
    • Colour used as highlights
  • Tara Hardy (see examples here)
    • Light blue background, black-and-white portraits
    • Light style
    • Floral elements, often in red
  • Natsko Seki (see examples here)
    • Urban landscapes with lots of details / content
    • Colourful
    • Collage-style mixed with drawings/paintings
    • Light style

Paper Installation

  • Ingela och Vi (see examples here)
    • Paper cut-outs / 3D-installations that are photographed
    • Playful scenes
  • Bela Borsodi (see examples here)
    • Bold colours
    • Pop art style
    • Provocative scenes

Mixed Media

  • Valero Doval (see examples here)
    • Light style, usually beige background
    • Focus on one (sometimes two) item like figure, portrait, animal, in black-and-white and colour
    • Realistic drawings, photographs
  • Drew Beckmeyer (see examples here)
    • Mix of bright and gloomy colours
    • Dark, surreal scenes
  • Brian Hubble (see examples here)
    • Mix of painting and photo collage
    • Political figures and buildings in artworks
  • Barbara Nessim (see examples here)
    • Black-and-white abstract figures
    • Colour for background and higlights
    • Figures and faces are simplified and abstract
  • Tina Berning (see examples here)
    • Often watercolours and photographs
    • Female portraits in black-and-white with coloured higlights or shapes
  • Martin Haake (see my previous review here, and examples here)
    • Colourful scenes
    • Simplified and abstract figures and places
    • Collage and paintings mixed
    • Often lined with some written explanations/description for the illustration, especially for the place/country illustrations

Prints

  • Cristóbal Schmal (see examples here)
    • Abstract / simplified scenes, usually involving one or more figures
    • Creative way of illustrating ideas
    • Screenprint/riso print

Experimental (Sewing, mixed media, others)

  • Esther Gebauer (see examples here)
    • Illustrations made with sewing, collage, textiles, coffee stains, etc)
    • Colourful
    • Creative and experimental ideas
    • Airy style

Digital Collage

  • Cecilia Carlstedt (see examples here)
    • Fashion illustration
    • Female portraits
    • Little use of colours (only as highlights)
    • Light style

Digital Drawing

  • Douglas Alves (see examples here)
    • Portraits in black-and-white with lots of details and content, e.g. as background and decoration, or as part of the portrait, e.g. hair made of flowers and palms
    • Illustrations added to digital photographs
  • Matei Apostolescu (see examples here)
    • Vibrant colours in lines that create the figures or landscapes
    • Surreal scenes
  • Andrew Bannecker (see examples here)
    • Vector style, often using geometrical forms
    • Mainly landscapes, a few portraits/animal illustrations
    • Smooth look-and-feel
    • Abstract figures and landscapes
  • Kari Modén (see examples here)
    • Vibrant colours
    • Shapes create other shapes, e.g. figures
    • Flat, abstract style
    • Figures interacting with each other, portraits and landscapes

This is the first part of this exercise. I think I might add to this list as I go along. It helps to look at the great variety of styles and tools out there to create artwork. One thing I have noticed that I personally prefer the “handmade” illustrations more than the ones that are completely done digitally. It might be that they appear to “perfect” in my view, or that I feel the personal touch is missing – even though you can clearly see the artist’s voice in there.

For the second part of this exercise I will analyse two artworks from different artists, and then go back to my own work and re-create them with the same tools and materials of the artists I looked at more closely.

 

References

Illustrationweb.com. “Christopher Corr”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Christopher Corr”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Fumi Nakamura”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Steve Brodner”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Keemo Illustrator”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Julia Guther”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL, URL, URL

Vogue.com. “From a New York Painter, a New Reason to Head West” by Katie Chang. Published on May 8, 2017. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Hope Gangloff”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Yoko Shimizu”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Madeleine Stamer”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Margot Macé”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Toril Baekmark”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Stina Persson”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018].URL

Google Picture Search. “Raquel Aparicio”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Natsko Seki”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Cuded.com. “FASHION ILLUSTRATIONS BY NAJA CONRAD-HANSEN”. Published on March 19, 2013. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Anne Faith Nicholls”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Andrew Hem”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Olaf Hajek”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Amanda Visell”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Irana Douer”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Vincent Bakkum illustrator”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Kristiana Pärn”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “David Bueno Illustrator”. [Accessed on April 1, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Ilana Kohn illustration”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Ingela och Vi”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Emmanuel Polanco”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Maximo Tuja”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Tara Hardy”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Bela Borsodi”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Valero Doval”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Drew Beckmeyer”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Brian Hubble”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Barbara Nessim illustration”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Tina Berning”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Martin Haake”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Cristóbal Schmal”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Esther Gebauer”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Cecilia Carlstedt”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Douglas Alves”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Matei Apostolescu”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Andrew Bannecker”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

Google Picture Search. “Kari Modén”. [Accessed on April 2, 2018]. URL

 

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